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Thursday, 16 June 2011 09:52

Siler and Thorsby are Sandy Bridge E boards

Written by Fuad Abazovic


Quad channel memory with 8 slots
Intel has spilled the beans on two boards that are scheduled to launch along with Sandy Bridge E, Intel’s future performance processor.

We have already mentioned that Sandy Bridge E can end up with 3.6GHz clock that gets to 3.9GHz with the help of Turbo and the boards for it will naturally support and endorse overclocking. The top board will end up with DX70SI name and its currently being developed under the Siler codename. The board comes with LGA 2011 also known as Socket R support and it has two graphics card PCI 16X slots. Don't worry the board supports both Crossfire and SLI.

The board comes in ATX, of course and not in the already deceased BTX format. It comes with USB 3.0, Dual LAN, RAID and 8 DIMM slots. The runner up board is codenamed Thorsby and will launch under DX79TO (TO as in Thorsby, SI as in Siler ed.) and promises to be slightly different than Siler. It also has 2x16X PCIe slots for both Crossfire and SLI, 8 DIMM slots, Overclocking support, RAID and USB 3.0. It is no surprise that it comes in ATX format. The main difference in these thin specs we've seen is the TPM support, and to our best knowledge this should be the trusted platform module support, something that only a few ultra rich gamers, a key target audience might need.

It's safe to assume that chipset comes with X79, the first real successor to the venerable X58 chipset that lasted for years. .
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Comments  

 
-1 #1 themassau 2011-06-16 10:18
the stopid thing is that you only have 2 pcie slots even if they are v3 it isn't good because you can't put an ssd and crossfire on it (i'm just talking for enthusiasts) so more pcie slots would be better than more dimm memory.
 
 
+7 #2 bardenck 2011-06-16 19:43
Quoting themassau:
the stopid thing is that you only have 2 pcie slots even if they are v3 it isn't good because you can't put an ssd and crossfire on it (i'm just talking for enthusiasts) so more pcie slots would be better than more dimm memory.


im sure more versions will be made upon release.
 
 
+4 #3 loadwick 2011-06-16 22:23
there will be 8x PCIe and 4x PCIe which easily work fast enough for SSDs.
 
 
+2 #4 derwin75 2011-06-17 15:59
I would wait for EVGA to come out with their own X79 motherboards.
 
 
0 #5 hoohoo 2011-06-18 17:05
I really like the quad channel memory. Should have massive memory bandwidth. :-)
 
 
+1 #6 loadwick 2011-06-18 22:04
Quoting hoohoo:
I really like the quad channel memory. Should have massive memory bandwidth. :-)



I really don't think quad channel is going to make a difference. When you look at the benchmarks for dual to triple channel there is barely an increase, same with 1333MHz to 2133MHz, and i can't see triple to quad will be any different.

Memory bandwidth is just not the bottleneck it used to be years ago, not for the vast majority of programs.

I think maybe a highly overclocked 8+ core CPU could benefit from more bandwidth in some apps but I really hope Intel have more up their sleeve than quad channel and more cache as that will not be worth Intel's high end prices!
 

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